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Meniere's Disease

26 Mar 2012
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Image source: Chittka L, Brockmann; Wikimedia Commons – Human Ear Anatomy

OVERVIEW

Meniere's disease is a rare disorder that affects the ear. It usually appears as an 'attack' (which lasts for between 2–3 hours) during which there is a drop in hearing, pressure and/or ringing in the ear and vertigo.

The causes of Meniere's disease is unknown. Attacks can occur daily or as rarely as once a year.

Causes

Though the cause of Meniere's disease is unknown, it is thought that pressure in the ear contributes to the condition.

Risk factors for developing Meniere's include:

  • Allergies
  • Autoimmune problems
  • Genetic factors
  • Chemical imbalance in the inner ear
  • Viral infections
  • Blood vessel problems

 

Symptoms
  • Tinnitus
  • Vertigo
  • Loss of hearing
  • Sense of fullness in the inner ear

 

Treatment
  • Low-salt diet
  • Medication
  • Treatment of underlying health conditions
  • Physiotherapy
  • Treatment for stress, anxiety and depression
  • Surgery

 

If you have any of the above symptoms consult your general practitioner.

 

VIDEOS

 


Video: What is Meniere's Disease?

 

RESOURCES & SUPPORT

Local

The Hearing Association
Hearwell.co.nz – Meniere's Disease

 

International

NHS – Meniere's Disease
Meniere's Society UK
National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders – Meniere's Disease
Meniere's-Disease CA

 

RESEARCH

British Medical Journal
Journal of the American Medical Association
The Lancet

 

FORUMS

Meniere's Talk Forum
MedHelp – Meniere's Forum
Meniere's Disease UK – Forum
DailyStrength – Meniere's Disease Support Group

 

 

DISCLAIMER
The information above is of a general nature and is designed to provide you with an overview of the topic with links to local and international resources which maybe of interest.  We do our best to ensure that this information is accurate and up to date.

You should always, however, seek specific professional medical advice, treatment and care appropriate to you, and as such we strongly recommend you consult with your general practitioner first.

 

 

Updated April 2012
Image source: Wikimedia Commons – Anatomy of the Human Ear