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Tagged: Medicine

5 Questions to ask when you are offered an alternative brand

NPS has released a new quick question guide for consumers designed to help them make a safe and confident choice between medicine brands.

Available on the NPS website, the 5 questions cover what consumers should ask their pharmacist when they are offered a different brand of their medicine so that they make the right choice for them.

  • 30 Mar 2012

1 in 5 Australians experienced adverse effect from medicine

New research from NPS* has found 1 in 5 Australians have experienced an adverse effect from their medicine in the past 12 months, like nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and fatigue.

  • 28 Mar 2012

Medicines in NZ

About this guide
Information and Cost Sources
Adverse Reactions
For further information

 

About this guide

  • This guide provides an overview of medicines in the NZ health system
  • Information is presented in a summary format to convey key points and provide links to more detailed information
  • Key sources of information in this guide are MedSafe, PHARMAC and CARM (the Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring) - links to relevant detailed information from these sources are provided
  • We welcome suggestions to improve this guide and hope you find it a useful starting point

 

Information and Cost Sources

MedSafe - for medicine information

The MedSafe website is the main source of information on medicines for consumers in NZ
About MedSafe and the products it regulates and about Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) - useful information about your medicine written for consumers/patients

PHARMAC - for medicine cost

About the Pharmaceutical Management Agency of New Zealand, the Pharmaceutical Schedule and subsidised medicines
The Pharmaceutical Schedule is where you go to find out if your medicine is subsidised

Adverse Reactions

Reporting Adverse Reactions

Where to report adverse reactions, what they can be reported for (includes medicines, vaccines, over the counter and herbal), and who can report (includes self-reporting - you)

For further information

 

Last updated: January 2012

DISCLAIMER

The information above is of a general nature and is designed to provide you with an overview of the topic with links to resources that maybe of interest.  Although we do our best to ensure that this information is accurate and up to date, you should not rely solely on the information provided here.

You should always seek specific professional medical advice, treatment and care appropriate to you, and as such we strongly recommend you consult with your general practitioner.

 

  • 29 Jan 2012

MedSafe

About MedSafe
Consumer Medicine Information (CMI)
For further information

 

About MedSafe

  • The MedSafe website is the main source of information on medicines for consumers in NZ
  • MedSafe is the New Zealand Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Authority
  • MedSafe is the authority responsible for the regulation of therapeutic products in New Zealand
  • It is a business unit of the Ministry of Health

Medsafe regulates therapeutic products including:
  • Medicines
  • Related products
  • Herbal remedies
  • Medical devices
  • Controlled drugs used as medicines

 

Consumer Medicine Information

  • Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) are published on the MedSafe website
  • CMI is useful information about your medicine and is written for consumers/patients
  • The MedSafe site contains hundreds of pdfs on medicines available in NZ
  • CMI do not contain all the available information about the medicine
  • Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns about taking the medicine

 

CMI contains advice such as:
  • What the medicine is used for
  • How it should be taken
  • What side effects can occur
  • When you must not use it
  • How long to take it
  • Who supplies the medicine
  • Ingredients
  • Storage
  • Whether you can drive or drink alcohol while taking the medicine
  • What to do if you miss a dose

 

Who produces Consumer Medicine Information (CMI)
  • Pharmaceutical companies are responsible for producing CMI
  • The CMIs that are on the MedSafe website have been written by pharmaceutical companies, using Guidelines set by Medsafe
  • The companies self-assess what information goes in each CMI against the requirements of the Guidelines
  • MedSafe does not evaluate or approve CMIs, therefore MedSafe is not responsible for the information contained in a CMI

For further information

 

 

Last updated: January 2012

DISCLAIMER

The information above is of a general nature and is designed to provide you with an overview of the topic with links to resources that maybe of interest.  Although we do our best to ensure that this information is accurate and up to date, you should not rely solely on the information provided here.

You should always seek specific professional medical advice, treatment and care appropriate to you, and as such we strongly recommend you consult with your general practitioner.

 

  • 25 Jan 2012

PHARMAC

About PHARMAC

  • PHARMAC is the Pharmaceutical Management Agency of New Zealand
  • You can search the  Pharmaceutical Schedule for information about what medicines are funded in New Zealand, and how much they might cost you
  • PHARMAC is a medicine funder and decision-maker within the New Zealand Medicines System
  • PHARMAC reports directly to the Minister of Health
  • The Minister is responsible for PHARMAC’s performance and for appointing the PHARMAC Board and setting expectations of PHARMAC
  • DHBs hold the funding for the Combined Pharmaceutical Budget
  • PHARMAC works on behalf of DHBs to negotiate prices for medicines, set subsidy levels and conditions, and ensure spending stays within budget
  • The PHARMAC website includes a range of information for patients and consumers, such as information sheets and information on the Consumer Advisory Committee and getting involved in consultation

Medicine brand changes
  • To generate savings PHARMAC must be able to make choices to change the brand of medicine that is funded
  • When these changes happen PHARMAC works to support patients and health professionals, ensuring they are well informed
  • PHARMAC provides a range of resources on brand changes

 

For further information

 

Last updated: January 2012

DISCLAIMER

The information above is of a general nature and is designed to provide you with an overview of the topic with links to resources that maybe of interest.  Although we do our best to ensure that this information is accurate and up to date, you should not rely solely on the information provided here.

You should always seek specific professional medical advice, treatment and care appropriate to you, and as such we strongly recommend you consult with your general practitioner.

  • 25 Jan 2012

Reporting Adverse Reactions

Where to Report Adverse Reactions
Adverse reactions can be reported for
Who can report?
New Zealand reporting rates
For further information

 

Where to Report Adverse Reactions

  • The  Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring (CARM) collates information and reports on people experiencing adverse reactions to prescription medicines and adverse event following immunisation in New Zealand
  • Anyone can report adverse reactions to medicine or adverse event following immunisation at the CARM site
  • CARM accepts reports from consumers but where possible an attempt is made to involve the patient’s practitioner who often may be unaware of the reaction
  • CARM sends replies to reporters of adverse reactions. These written responses may include information about causality, similar reactions and prescribing advice to assist with risk:benefit assessment of future treatment for the patient involved

 

Adverse reactions can be reported for

  • All Medicines
  • Vaccines
  • "Over-the-Counter" (OTC) medicines
  • Herbal, traditional and alternative remedies
  • Events to IMMP medicines

 

Who can report?

  • Doctors
  • Pharmacists
  • Nurses
  • Self
  • Other Health Professionals (eg midwife)
  • Pharmaceutical companies

 

New Zealand reporting rates

  • New Zealand has the highest rate of reporting adverse reactions to medicines in the world, both in terms of reports per 1000 doctors and reports per million population
  • This reflects that we are more diligent about reporting these events, rather than indicating a a bigger problem in New Zealand
  • it is estimated that only 5% of all reactions are reported so there is still room for improvement
  • 65% of the reports CARM receives are from community doctors (mostly general practitioners) while hospital doctors contribute 17% of the reports. Pharmacists (community and hospital) submit 2.3% of the reports lodged with CARM

 

For further information

 

Last updated: January 2012

DISCLAIMER

The information above is of a general nature and is designed to provide you with an overview of the topic with links to resources that maybe of interest.  Although we do our best to ensure that this information is accurate and up to date, you should not rely solely on the information provided here.

You should always seek specific professional medical advice, treatment and care appropriate to you, and as such we strongly recommend you consult with your general practitioner.

  • 25 Jan 2012

Dunne announces NZ Medicines Formulary

Health professionals will soon have access to an up-to-date, comprehensive and New Zealand-specific medicines information resource, Associate Health Minister Peter Dunne announced today.

  • 05 Sep 2011